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Patients Against Lymphoma

 

Side EffectsBowel & Bladder side effects

Last update: 11/12/2016

TOPICS
 

Diarrhea | Constipation | Bladder & Urinary

Here we provide resources for problems related to bowel and the bladder that may occur with treatment.

General Resources:

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"Eating Well Through Cancer" by Holly Clegg  Amazon.com
 
Focuses on cancer and nutrition with a mainstream approach. 
Recipes were selected to ease symptoms while undergoing treatment and to maintain a healthier lifestyle. (Patient-recommended. PAL has no affiliations with the authors.)


Diarrhea

In the News

bullet Cure: Managing treatment related diarrhea

Diarrhea is a digestive disorder that causes excessive bowel movements and loose stools. It's a condition associated with many standard cancer treatments. Acute diarrhea usually lasts a few days at most. Chronic diarrhea can last much longer and is considered more serious. Symptoms include abdominal pain, cramping, urge to defecate, discomfort, and fecal incontinence. 

Patients with uncontrolled diarrhea are at increased risk for dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, skin breakdown, and fatigue.For many treatment regimens, diarrhea is a dose-limiting toxicity. mcw.edu

Factors:

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Consistency may be a more reliable indicator of diarrhea than frequency. 
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Diet to help control
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low-residue diet at treatment initiation 
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low-lactose diet in individuals with temporary lactose intolerance 
may prevent, reduce, or control diarrhea in some patients receiving cancer therapy  
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In cancer patients, the most common cause of diarrhea is cancer treatment (chemotherapy, radiation therapy, bone marrow transplantation, or surgery).

Other causes of diarrhea include antibiotic therapy, stress and anxiety related to being diagnosed with cancer and undergoing cancer treatment; and infection. Infection may be caused by viruses, bacteria, fungi, or other harmful microorganisms. Antibiotic therapy can cause inflammation of the lining of the bowel, resulting in diarrhea that often does not respond to treatment. 

Investigational for severe ... "use of octreotide in patients receiving pelvic radiation complicated by diarrhea shortened the duration of symptoms and facilitated more continuous radiation treatment, with fewer interruptions. Octreotide therapy appeared to be well tolerated; however, octreotide given on an outpatient basis is quite expensive. It is not known whether octreotide can prevent the onset of diarrhea." Medscape (free login req.)

Resources

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Cancer and diarrhea  wehealny.org | MayoClinic.com | MedlinePlus
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Abdominal Pain, Acute: Self-Care Flowcharts  familydoctor.org
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Abdominal Pain, Chronic: Self-Care Flowcharts  familydoctor.org
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Diarrhea in Cancer  ACS
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Diarrhea: Self-Care Flowcharts  familydoctor.org
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Preventing Dehydration From Diarrhea  NIH
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A randomized trial of yogurt for prevention of antibiotic-associated diarrhea.
Dig Dis Sci. 2003 Oct;48(10):2077-82. PMID: 14627358 | Related articles 
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Constipation

Constipation is digestive disorder that causes infrequent and difficult bowel movements. It's a side effect  associated with many medications, including standard cancer treatments.  You should consult your doctor when you have a significant change in bowel movements.

Severe constipation can be life threatening.

General Guidelines

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Ask your doctor about laxatives and stool softeners.
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Drink plenty of liquids.
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Eat foods with fiber content, such as celery and cooked whole grains; 
limit flour products.
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Keep active.
Recommended
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Constipation and Cancer Treatment  cancercenter.com
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"Eating Well Through Cancer" ~ by Holly Clegg, Gerald Miletello MD  Web 
Topic searches on Constipation and Cancer Therapy
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Medscape | PubMed

Resources

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About Constipation and treatment gastro.org 
American Gastroenterological Association

Articles

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Opioid Antagonists Can Control Opioid-Induced Constipation cancernetwork.com

Clinical Trials

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Phase III Randomized Study of Naloxone for Opioid-Induced Constipation in Patients With Chronic Malignant or Non-malignant Pain www.cancer.gov
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Bladder and Urinary Complications

Here we list resources related to bladder and urinary problems that are sometimes experienced by patients receiving treatment for lymphoma and other cancers.

Topic searches on Bladder and Urinary Problems associated with Cancer Therapy
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Medscape | PubMed
Resources
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Cystitis (infection): Successful treatment of severe hemorrhagic cystitis after hemopoietic cell transplantation by selective embolization of the vesical arteries. Bone Marrow Transplant. 2003 May; 31(10): 923-5. PMID: 12748670 | Related articles
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Urinary incontinence (Nocturia)  MedlinePlus | Medscape
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Urologic Toxicities Christopher J. Logothetis, MD, Jose E. Sarriera, MD  cancer.org- PDF 
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Urinary frequency/urgency  Medlineplus
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BK Virus: In bone marrow transplant recipients it is notable as a cause for hemorrhagic cystitis. Wikipedia
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Disclaimer:  The information on Lymphomation.org is not intended to be a substitute for 
professional medical advice or to replace your relationship with a physician.
For all medical concerns,  you should always consult your doctor. 
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